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PIKE, EMORY

pike emory j

Having gone forward to reconnoiter new machine-gun positions, Lt. Col. Pike offered his assistance in reorganizing advanced infantry units which had become disorganized during a heavy artillery shelling. He succeeded in locating only about 20 men, but these he advanced and when later joined by several infantry platoons rendered inestimable service in establishing outposts, encouraging all by his cheeriness, in spite of the extreme danger of the situation. When a shell had wounded one of the men in the outpost, Lt. Col. Pike immediately went to his aid and was severely wounded himself when another shell burst in the same place. While waiting to be brought to the rear, Lt. Col. Pike continued in command, still retaining his jovial manner of encouragement, directing the reorganization until the position could be held. The entire operation was carried on under terrific bombardment, and the example of courage and devotion to duty, as set by Lt. Col. Pike, established the highest standard of morale and confidence to all under his charge. The wounds he received were the cause of his death.

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Service

Rank

Division

U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel Division Machine-gun Officer, 82d Division

Conflict

Year of honor

born

World War One 1918 Columbus City, Louisa County, Iowa

Citation

Having gone forward to reconnoiter new machine-gun positions, Lt. Col. Pike offered his assistance in reorganizing advanced infantry units which had become disorganized during a heavy artillery shelling. He succeeded in locating only about 20 men, but these he advanced and when later joined by several infantry platoons rendered inestimable service in establishing outposts, encouraging all by his cheeriness, in spite of the extreme danger of the situation. When a shell had wounded one of the men in the outpost, Lt. Col. Pike immediately went to his aid and was severely wounded himself when another shell burst in the same place. While waiting to be brought to the rear, Lt. Col. Pike continued in command, still retaining his jovial manner of encouragement, directing the reorganization until the position could be held. The entire operation was carried on under terrific bombardment, and the example of courage and devotion to duty, as set by Lt. Col. Pike, established the highest standard of morale and confidence to all under his charge. The wounds he received were the cause of his death.